Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Home News Study finds smart irrigation controllers need more “smarts”

Study finds smart irrigation controllers need more “smarts”

The six devices tested applied up to 2½ times more water than was recommended.

Garden Center | October 1, 2009

Tests of "smart" irrigation controllers found most of the devices currently on the market are not as smart as hoped, said Texas AgriLife Extension Service irrigation experts.

The six devices tested, all currently on the market, applied from about one-third to two-and-a-half times more water than was recommended, according to Charles Swanson, AgriLife Extension associate with the Texas A&M University department of biological and agricultural engineering.

"These devices have the potential to save water, but our data shows they're just not there yet," Swanson said.
Smart controllers use weather data to automatically adjust the amount of irrigation water applied. Some smart controllers use sensors at the irrigation sites to measure temperature and rainfall. They may also measure solar radiation, wind speed and relative humidity.

Other controllers, commonly called ET Controllers, use evapotranspiration data acquired either through the Internet, telephone or pager to estimate landscape water requirements, he said. Both ET and on-site sensor controllers use the data they receive to estimate evapotranspiration at the site and apply enough water to offset it.

Swanson and Dr. Guy Fipps, an AgriLife Extension engineer and director of the Irrigation Technology Center, tested both types of controllers over an eight-week period from early August through late September. ET controller bench tests were conducted in an indoor laboratory while an outdoor lab test was used for the controllers with on-site sensors.

Why the gross inaccuracy?

Part of the answer is that there are several methods to calculate evapotranspiration. Swanson and Fipps used the Standardized Penmen-Monteith method, a model generally recognized as the gold standard. This method takes into account many factors, including solar radiation, Swanson said. Generally, methods that factor in solar radiation will be more accurate.

"From what I've been able to gather, some companies are tying into the (local) airport or weather stations that are posted online, because every city has an airport," Swanson said. "ET data calculated with such weather data tends to be inaccurate.”

Swanson noted that the units with on-site sensors did better in the tests than the ET controllers. The on-site sensor controllers applied on average about 70 percent less water than the ET controllers, and saved water compared to most manual applications.

Typically, manually controlled irrigation units on timers apply about twice as much water as needed, he said.

A copy of the report can be viewed on the Irrigation Technology Centers Web site.

 

Top news

Find your star customers

You may think you know your customers inside and out, but you may be wrong.

XXpire WG insecticide receives federal registration

New chemistry controls 39 of the toughest ornamental pests.

AmericanHort launches initiative to explore the future of garden retail

The organization will partner with a design college to help reshape how products are marketed and perceived.

California imposing mandatory water restrictions

Under the new regulations, nurseries in some districts will only be permitted to water between midnight and 6 a.m.

Record number of attendees reported at Cutivate’14

The trade show formerly known as OFA Short Course attracted more than 10,000 people, according to AmericanHort.