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Pleasant View Gardens receives honor

Loudon, N.H., grower named 2010 Family Business of the Year

| May 25, 2010

Pleasant View Gardens was named the 2010 Family Business of the Year by the University of New Hampshire Center for Family Business. 
“The life, history, and achievements of the Huntington family tell a remarkable story of how hard work, dedication, and family unity can establish a thriving business,” said Barbara Draper, director of the UNH Center for Family Business.
Owned by the Huntington family, Pleasant View Gardens is largest wholesale grower in New Hampshire, and one of the largest in New England.
In 1976, Jonathan and Eleanor Huntington, and sons Jeff and Henry, moved from Connecticut to Loudon to purchase Pleasant View Gardens, a wholesale greenhouse company. At that time, the facility consisted of three greenhouses and 10 employees. The customer base focused on local florists and provided only walk-in trade. 
Today, Pleasant View has two facilities in the state with 13 acres of greenhouses, 15 acres of outdoor growing space, and $21 million in sales. Pleasant View Gardens is a founding partner of Proven Winners. They are also a partner in Ticoplant, an offshore stock facility in Costa Rica, and a partner in Plant 21, a breeder of new plant genetics.  It is owned and operated by sons Jeff and Henry Huntington, and a third generation (Jeff and Henry’s five sons) has begun to fill the ranks of the Huntington family business.
For the full story, click here.
 
Pictured: 3 Generations of the Huntington Family. Front row From Left to Right: Eleanor Huntington, Sharon Huntington and Barbara Draper, Center Director. Back row from Left to right Ben Huntington, Jeff Huntington, Jonathan Huntington
and Henry Huntington.

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